Sales Thought: Whether you know it or not, you earn the right to speak and to be listened to by your customers.

This is the logical Follow up to Strategic Listening.

After a Sales Call, what impression does a customer get of your your sales call? Does your sales call leave the customer feeling like it’s a one-way street with you and your product the center of attention? If so, you are in trouble.

I frequently observe sales people delivering a one-way conversation where the customer is left feeling like a victim of “drive-buy” selling.

Anything less than focused (or Strategic!)  listening will be viewed by them as not caring, and a one-sided interaction.

Sales Tactic: Become comfortable talking less and listening more.

Find a balance between listening versus talking. It needs to work for you and your style. My guess is that the balance you currently have may be talk-heavy and listen-light.

Work on this balance regularly. Just pick one call each week to focus on how much you are talking versus listening. (Without actively and regularly measuring myself, we are not conscious of of our personal ratio of talk versus listen.)

To be great in sales, one must learn the proper balance between talking and listening. The goal should be to create a productive, problem-focused dialogue with the customer. If you can, then you have started a professional conversation – one with some prospect of advancing the business relationship.

Sales Thought: Carrying on a two-way conversation is the most effective way to show that you have the ability to listen and ask good questions!

Learning a proper balance that works for you and your style is key.

Sales professionals learn the proper balance between asking questions and creating a realistic dialogue with the customer.

Starting and maintaining professional sales conversation is a critical skill. If you can create a fluid selling conversation with the buyer, you have taken the first step in avoiding the temptation that affects so many sales people – the need to pitch product.

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